Pi Newsletter

0  comments

Raspberry Pi LEARN

Facebook
Twitter
Website
Instagram
YouTube

News

The Astro Pi team have received 163 final reports from 22 countries for this year's Mission Space Lab Challenge. This is a 44% increase on last year, which is remarkable given the obstacles faced by teams during lockdown. 32% of the teams were female and we received 61 experiments in the 'Life in space' category and 102 in 'Life on Earth'.

Be the first to hear about the launch of the 20/21 challenge this September by subscribing to our newsletter!
Scratch isn't just for beginners! Check out our support tutorials for parents and carers on all things Scratch–related. Explore the Scratch community and get ready to make some challenging Scratch projects at home.
 

Prepare to be amazed and inspired by the young tech creators that took part in this year's Coolest Projects. The Coolest Projects online showcase is filled with 560 projects from 775 participants from all over the world.

Check out the projects.
 

Why do girls choose computing?
In the latest blog for Gender Balance in Computing, Katharine Childs and Dan Fisher explore how young people make choices to learn about computing at clubs and in classrooms, and how these choices differ between boys and girls.

Read the article.
 
Teachers: join us for a summer of learning on our 'Computer Science Accelerator in the Summer' programme! Get a £920 bursary to grow your skillset, and power up your knowledge for the next academic year.

Find out more.
 

Community

Head of Code Club UK and Ireland, Lucia Manzitti, has been finding out how Code Clubs around the world are keeping kids coding during the pandemic. Recently she spoke to Maddy Bazett, Program Owner of Code Club Canada.

When schools and community spaces started to close across Canada, Maddy and the team knew they needed to rise to the challenge. They wanted to make sure that kids attending Code Clubs could keep coding from home, and that others new to coding had the opportunity to have a go! The team’s quick reaction enabled them to set up free online Code Club sessions within the first week! At first, they were launched as a public drop-in model, but this was soon adapted to attendees having to preregister for a school term. Code Club Canada set up six coding sessions and a final sharing session both in English and in French, to offer support to learners speaking either language.

Every session is hosted on Whereby, and has a facilitator instructor and a moderator to monitor members’ questions and chat. This team comes from KCJ, a bilingual Canadian charity whose mission is to give every Canadian child access to digital skills education, and who support Code Club Canada with their mission. 

The young learners mainly work on Scratch and Python projects as the experience is entirely on the computer. Maddy shared that from the 17 March to 14 May, members spent a total of 763 hours coding online with Code Club Canada! A live online Code Club provides a different learning environment for members compared to an in-person club. Members had been used to buddying up with a friend to work through projects, but they now work online, independently, and sometimes with a parent. 

Facilitators shared how learners had become more dependent on the step-by-step instructions, and got used to working on a split screen and switching tabs. With time, they became more confident, interacting with the facilitator, sharing their screens, and using their mic to ask questions. An online Code Club still provided an opportunity for young coders to share their cool projects with their peers. But instead of their peers being from their school, they were often from a completely different part of the country. “We have heard back that kids are very excited when a club member is from another part of Canada and are in awe and ask: ‘How are you here, from somewhere else?”

Even in these strange times, Code Club is still helping people to connect. 

Projects

Learn how to make a timer, so that you can use it to challenge your friends in our Against the Clock project!
In our Compass Maze project, use the the Sense HAT as a compass to navigate out of a maze of colourful rooms. 
Create a game in which you have to guide a parrot past scrolling pipes to score points in the Flappy Parrot project!
Copyright © 2020 Raspberry Pi Foundation. All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you signed up to the Raspberry Pi Foundation's Education email list at http://www.raspberrypi.org/education

Our mailing address is:
The Raspberry Pi Foundation

37 Hills Road

Cambridge, Cambridgeshire CB2 1NT

United Kingdom

About the author 

Mark Rauterkus

Webmaster and long-time open-source advocate. Also a swim, water polo and SKWIM coach in Pittsburgh.

You may also like

Social Media, a 12-minute film from Mozilla

Social Media, a 12-minute film from Mozilla

Beta test a training calculator from Warren Ma

Beta test a training calculator from Warren Ma

iOS Human Interface Guidelines from Apple

iOS Human Interface Guidelines from Apple

BBC Global News Podcast on code, web safety for kids, Roadblocks, virtual worlds

BBC Global News Podcast on code, web safety for kids, Roadblocks, virtual worlds

New, open source smart watch with heart rate and motion detection

New, open source smart watch with heart rate and motion detection

Matt’s State of the Word address

Matt’s State of the Word address

Systems that run forever, self-heal and scale.

Systems that run forever, self-heal and scale.

Bye bye Coach’s Eye

Bye bye Coach’s Eye

Older art statements

Older art statements

Page [tcb_pagination_current_page] of [tcb_pagination_total_pages]

{"email":"Email address invalid","url":"Website address invalid","required":"Required field missing"}

Let's be more social and share!

>